The Kite Runner: Book Review

Image result for the kite runner

Hello people! What’s new? I have had pretty adventurous last few weeks trying to juggle time between college applications and reading!These times can be pretty tough, no? Somehow, I managed to sail through and now I am back to my blog. I hope you people haven’t forgotten about my blog and excuse me for not being regular…

So before analyzing the book, some words of enlightenment…Keep the title of the book in mind as you finish reading the last page of the novel as it is the medium through which you realize how beautifully the book transforms from being about one character to another! Trust me, the moment is so emotionally entrenched, it is enough to give you goosebumps and stays with your soul forever.

” For you, a thousand times over.”

Plot

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini is a novel which spirals between the past and present of two characters Amir and Hassan, poles apart, but sharing a common thread which links their life forever. In the beginning of the novel we meet a grown up Amir, settled in US.A, faced with apprehension and dilemma as he receives a message calling him home. A home which he had left long back. A home which he called ,Kabul. The words then travel back in time and two carefree boys , with the elder one (Amir) narrating their tale, comes into view. The story then moves forward describing the incidents of the nonchalant childhood of the dedicated friend Hassan and the dependent owner Amir. In an attempt to win his father’s respect and love, Amir and Hassan enter into a kite flying competition, which changes their lives beyond redemption. As time flows by, the political turmoil increases in Kabul, To avoid the tumultuous Amir shifts to U.S.A with his father and starts over. Years later unavoidable circumstances call him back to his homeland to discover some startling truths which give him a chance to repay his debt to Hassan.

Writing Style

The novel is written mostly in first person perspective, divided by different time periods. The story is narrated by the protagonist Amir with dashes of life experiences provided by the other characters. It takes into view the various political aspects that plagued the world during the late 1990s to early 2000s and and how common people were affected during those onsets. The only addition in the novel which could have satisfied the readers’ (or specifically my ) curiosity had we gotten a chance to read about his life, through Hassan’s point of view.


Characters


There are mainly six characters in the novel aided by other characters who help take the story forward.


Amir : The (legitimate) son of an Afghan businessman whose mother died during childbirth. His friendship with his servant, Hassan, forms a major part of the story until the time his cowardice forbids him from saving Hassan from a horrific fate during childhood and pushes him in a trench of self-consuming guilt all through his adult life. In the circle of life (The Lion King feels, right?) he ultimately absolves his sins and becomes ‘The Kite Runner’ for a child who linked his past and future together.


Hassan: The (illegitimate) son of an Afghan businessman who was fostered by the same nursemaid is Amir’s(I gave away the spoilers, already). His dedication towards his master and fearlessness turns him a target for bullies, for which he has to pay a great price. His life revolves around his master cum friend who ditches in him in the hour of need. His unflinching support and trust for Amir results in his untimely demise and is survived by a son, who is later adopted by Amir.


Baba: Father of Amir and Hassan who leads a dual life; a life full of fun, ambition, celebration, friendship and laughter and another full of guilt. He is shown to be a man who lives and dies for his principles at the same time, betraying them as he commits the biggest folly of his life; non acceptance of his own blood. His attention and love is always craved by his elder son Amir and provided in abundance (although secretly) to Hassan.


Shorab: Hassan’s son who is later adopted by Amir, after his parents’ demise. He comes across the readers as a replica of his father, who reminds Amir of his friendship and guilt everyday, until he dons the same role of a man, he had left behind in childhood.


Rahim Khan: Baba’s oldest and most trustworthy friend who provided Amir with all the love he had been missing since birth. He is the boys’ trusted confederate and adviser who later on provides Amir a chance to let go of his guilt.


Soraya: Amir’s wife and a school teacher who supports him throughout his writing career. She accepts the idea of adopting Shorab when she comes to know his identity and works tirelessly to bring a smile on his face , no matter what it takes.


Book Review


This book narrates a a timeless story which stays alive through time. Many themes are touched upon in the course of novel like friendship, gallantry, fatherhood, political turmoils, emotional, physical and mental abuse and the author plays full justice to each one. Each character has its own story to tell and fits in the narration perfectly. The plot is extremely gripping and keeps you at the edge all the times. With each page you turn, you begin on a new journey of the characters which ultimately culminates bringing together shards of life away from pain to laughter.


It is almost perfect, but there are a few things which could have elevated its status even more. A glimpse into Hassan’s life, his thoughts, his feelings, his relationships would have provided more depth to the story. A peek into Baba’s other life where he faced remorse and guilt and learnt to deal with it would have been a literary artwork. Also, a detailed description into Amir’s teenage years dealing with pain and sleepless nights, if provided, would have been a delight for the readers.


It is not just a tale to be read and forgotten about. It is a tale to be read, lived and remembered throughout. So this book is definitely a 4.2/5 for me. It would be a perfect literary getaway for the coming weekend. So grab this book and do read it, if you haven’t already and be prepared to float through the lanes of Kabul in search of a boy and boyhood, lost far behind.


Let me know in the comments section, if there is some book of your choice that I should review.


Till the next time, enjoy the weekend and don’t forget to follow my blog.


Cheers!

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